FreeNAS 9.10 Lab Build – Part 1

Since the early iterations of my home lab, I’ve been using FreeNAS for shared storage. Admittedly, I use only a fraction of what this powerful FreeBSD based solution is cable of, but I’ve always found it to be very reliable and it has met my needs.

Over the years, I have used it in several capacities, including as a virtual machine, on consumer grade hardware and more recently as a virtual machine with PCI pass-through of SAS and network devices.

After the recent overhaul of my home lab, I decided that it would be a good time to build a ‘semi-proper’ FreeNAS box that feels more like a permanent fixture. My goal was to bring something online that was:

  • Inexpensive.
  • Relatively small.
  • Using proper server-grade hardware with error correcting (ECC) memory.
  • Enough PCI-E expandability for a SAS card as well as a 10Gb NIC or Fiberchannel HBA in the future.
  • Somewhat power-efficient and quiet.
  • Preferably a Xeon based system and not an Atom or Avaton.

Some of the points above very rarely go hand-in-hand; like “inexpensive” and “Xeon” or “Proper server-grade” and “quiet”. This likely meant I’d be required to do a custom build from scratch.

The SAS Card – Dell PERC H200

Many would argue that a good storage build is focused around a good storage controller card. I had originally wanted to buy an LSI 9211-8i or an IBM M1015 card, but I came across a great deal on a Dell PERC H200 on eBay. It cost me only $25 CDN, and was an as-is, untested part so I took a chance on it. To my pleasant surprise, the card worked just fine.

IMG_0334

Although this is a Dell branded part, the PERC H200 is essentially just a SAS 2008 based LSI 9211-8i adapter. The most notable difference is the location of the SFF-8087 ports on the top of the card, instead of the end.

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Completely Removing NSX

NSX isn’t just a few virtual machines that can be deleted – there are hooks into numerous vCenter objects and it must be removed properly.

Admittedly, removing NSX from an environment was not my first choice of topics to cover, but I have found that the process is often misunderstood and done improperly. NSX isn’t just a few virtual machine appliances that can be deleted – there are hooks into numerous vCenter objects, your ESXi hosts and vCenter Server itself. To save yourself from some grief and a lot of manual cleanup, the removal must be done properly.

Thankfully, VMware does provide some high level instructions to follow in the public documentation. You’ll find these public docs for NSX 6.2.x and 6.3.x respectively here and here.

There are many reasons that someone may wish to remove NSX from a vSphere environment – maybe you’ve installed an evaluation copy to run a proof of concept or just want to start fresh again in your lab environment.  In my case I need to completely remove NSX 6.2.5 and install an older version of NSX for some version-specific testing in my home lab.

From a high level, the process should look something like this:

  1. Remove all VMs from Logical Switches.
  2. Remove NSX Edges and Distributed Logical Routers.
  3. Remove all Logical Switches.
  4. Uninstall NSX from all ESXi hosts in prepared clusters.
  5. Delete any Transport Zones.
  6. Delete the NSX Manager and NSX Controller appliances.
  7. Remove the NSX Manager hooks into vCenter, including the plugin/extension.
  8. Cleaning up the vSphere Web Client leftovers on the vCenter Server.

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Suppressing ESXi Shell and SSH Warnings

Are you tired of seeing SSH and Shell warnings on your ESXi hosts? If you are at all like me, it’s maddening to see yellow warnings and banners on hosts in the vCenter Server inventory – especially when it’s for something as simple as the ESXi Shell and SSH service being enabled.

Granted, what’s a minor annoyance in a lab environment might be a warning that’s taken seriously in a locked down production environment. In these sorts of environments, administrators will need to enable/disable SSH and Shell access on an as-needed basis. Without the alarms and banners, services may be left turned on accidentally.

 

ESXi Shell and SSH warning banners
Nobody likes warning banners on the summary page 😦

If you are using vSphere 6.0 or later, there is a nifty new ‘Suppress Warning’ option in the vSphere Web client. It can be found on the summary page of an ESXi host with an ESXi Shell or SSH warning currently triggered.

As you can see in the above screenshot, there are separate alerts for both the ESXi Shell and for SSH as well as an option to ‘Suppress Warning’ on each. Although it may appear that each can be suppressed independently, clicking one of the ‘Suppress Warning’ links will disable both ESXi Shell and SSH warnings on the host.

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