Category Archives: vCenter Server

Console Mouse Not Working in Windows VMs

I recently ran into some problems while deploying a Windows Server 2012 R2 VM in my vSphere 6.5 U2 lab. I’ve come to expect that the console mouse response is going to be terrible until VMware Tools is installed, but for some odd reason I had no mouse control whatsoever. Thinking it may be a quirk of the Web Console, I tried both the Remote Console and the HTML5 client to no avail.

The VM appeared to be healthy and would register keyboard input, but the motion of the mouse cursor was erratic or the cursor would not move at all. Thinking that I just needed to battle on and get Tools installed, I attempted to use the keyboard for this purpose – what a chore. You think it would have been easy, but the installer kept losing focus and falling behind other open windows. Many of the windows keyboard shortcuts I’d normally use were not functioning because they register on my laptop – not in the console. I couldn’t RDP to the VM either because the NIC needed to be configured with a valid IP address.

After doing a bit of research, it appeared that display scaling could cause all sorts of mouse issues – but this didn’t appear to be applicable in my case. That’s when I stumbled upon a communities thread that mentioned adding a USB controller to the VM. Even though my VM was ‘Hardware Version 13’, the USB 2.0 controller isn’t added by default.

I managed to get to the device manager using the keyboard, and you can see that the virtual hardware will use a PS/2 a mouse in the absence of a USB controller:

consolemouse-2

I then went ahead and added the basic USB 2.0 controller to the VM and booted it up.

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Certificate Error During Datastore Upload

I have recently rebuilt my home lab – an all too common occurrence due to the number of times I intentionally try to break things. In the process of rebuilding, I had some ISO files I wanted to copy over to a datastore. The process failed and the Web Client greeted me with an uncharacteristically long error message.

dsupload-1

The exact text reads:

“The operation failed for an undetermined reason. Typically, this problem occurs due to certificates that the browser does no trust. If you are using self-signed or custom certificates, open the URL below in a new browser tab and accept the certificate, then retry the operation.”

In my case, the URL that it listed was to one of my ESXi hosts in the compute-a cluster called esx-a2. The error then goes on to reference VMware KB 2147256.

It may seem odd that the vSphere Client would be telling you to visit a random ESXi host’s UI address when you are trying to upload a file via vCenter. But if you stop to think about it for a second, vCenter has no access whatsoever to your datastores. Whether you are trying to create a new VMFS datastore, upload a file or even just browse, vCenter must rely on an ESXi host with the necessary access to do the actual legwork. That ESXi host then relays the information back through the Web Client.

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Memory Usage Alarm with PCI Passthrough VMs

In the recent revamp of my lab environment, I decided to use VT-d passthrough for a pfsense VM. It has been working well with the integrated Intel igb based NICs on my management host, but I noticed that I started getting memory alarms on the VM.

vtd-mem-0

At first, I thought I may have sized the VM a bit too small with only 512MB of RAM, but when checking in the guest itself, I saw only a small amount was actually being used:

vtd-mem-2

At only 19% utilized, I’m nowhere near the 95% required to trigger this alarm. As you can see in the performance charts, all of the memory is being used by the guest from the perspective of ESXi:

vtd-mem-1

But after thinking about this for a moment, it makes sense – one of the requirements for PCI passthrough is to reserve all guest memory. For passthrough to function, the hypervisor must provide 100% consistent and reliable memory to the guest. What better way to ensure that then to reserve and pin all memory to the VM.

Although I understand why all memory is active and consumed, it’s unfortunate that vCenter doesn’t take into consideration the reason for this. In my search for an answer, I came across VMware KB 2149787. It appears that this can impact not only VMs with passthrough, but also fault tolerant VMs and VMs with latency sensitivity set to ‘high’. Unfortunately, the resolution suggested is to disable to virtual machine memory alarm at the vCenter object level. This effectively disables the alarm for everything in the inventory. I hope that at some point, vSphere will allow disabling specific alarms on a per-VM basis because few people would want to take this approach.

For now, I think the best course of action is to simply click ‘Reset to Green’, which should clear the alarm until the VM is powered off/on again. Just keep in mind that this is normal for this type of VM and that the alarm can be disregarded.

USB Passthrough and vMotion

I was recently speaking with someone about power management in a home lab environment. Their plan was to use USB passthrough to connect a UPS to a virtual machine in a vSphere cluster. From there, they could use PowerCLI scripting to gracefully power off the environment if the UPS battery got too low. This sounded like a wise plan.

Their concern was that the VM would need to be pinned to the host where the USB cable was connected and that vMotion would not be possible. To their pleasant surprise, I told them that support for vMotion of VMs with USB passthrough had been added at some point in the past and it was no longer a limitation.

When I started looking more into this feature, however, I discovered that this was not a new addition at all. In fact, this has been supported ever since USB passthrough was introduced in vSphere 4 over seven years ago. Have a look at the vSphere Administration Guide for vSphere 4 on page 105 for more information.

I had done some work with remote serial devices in the past, but I’ve never been in a situation where I needed to vMotion a VM with a USB device attached. It’s time to finally take this functionality for a test drive.

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VUM Challenges During vCenter 6.5 Upgrade

After procrastinating for a while, I finally started the upgrade process in my home lab to go from vSphere 6.0 to 6.5. The PSC upgrade was smooth, but I hit a roadblock when I started the upgrade process on the vCenter Server appliance.

After going through some of the first steps in the process, I ran into the following error when trying to connect to the source appliance.

vumupgrade-1

The exact text of the error reads:

“Unable to retrieve the migration assistant extension on source vCenter Server. Make sure migration assistant is running on the VUM server.”

I had forgotten that I even had Update Manager deployed. Because my lab is small, I generally applied updates manually to my hosts via the CLI. What I do remember, however, is being frustrated that I had to deploy a full-scale Windows VM to run the Update Manager service.

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Boosting vSphere Web Client Performance in ‘Tiny’ Deployments

In my home lab, I’ve been pretty happy with the vCenter Server ‘Tiny’ appliance deployment size. For the most part, vSphere Web Client performance has been decent and the appliance doesn’t need a lot of RAM or vCPUs.

When I most recently upgraded my lab, I considered using a ‘Small’ deployment but really didn’t want to tie up 16GB of memory – especially with only a small handful of hosts and many services offloaded to an external PSC

Although things worked well for the most part, I had recently been getting vCenter alarms and would get occasional periods of slow refreshes and other oddities.

vsphereclientmem-1

One of two alarms triggering frequently in my lab environment.

The two specific alarms were service health status alarms with the following text strings associated:

The vmware-dataservice-sca status changed from green to yellow

I’d also see this accompanied by a similar message referring to the vSphere Web Client:

The vsphere-client status changed from green to yellow

After doing some searching online, I quickly found VMware KB 2144950 on the subject. Although the cause of this seems pretty clear – insufficient memory allocation to the vsphere-client service – the workaround steps outlined in the KB are lacking context and could use some elaboration.

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