Category Archives: Install and Upgrade

Finding the NSX VIB Download URL

Although in most cases, it’s not necessary to obtain the NSX VIBs, there are some situations where you’ll need them. Most notably is when incorporating the VIBs into an image profile used for stateless auto-deploy ESXi hosts.

In older versions of NSX, including 6.0.x and 6.1.x, it used to be possible to use the very simple URL format as follows:

https://<nsxmanagerIP>/bin/vdn/vibs/<esxi-version>/vxlan.zip

For example, if you wanted the NSX VIBs for ESXi 5.5 hosts from an NSX manager with IP address 192.168.0.10, you’d use the following URL:

https://192.168.0.10/bin/vdn/vibs/5.5/vxlan.zip

This URL changed at some point, I expect with the introduction of NSX 6.2.x. VMware now uses a less predictable path, including build numbers. To get the exact locations for your specific version of NSX, you can visit the following URL:

https://<nsxmanagerIP>/bin/vdn/nwfabric.properties

When visiting this URL, you’ll be greeted by several lines of text output, which includes the path to the VIBs for various versions of ESXi. Below is some sample output you’ll see with NSX 6.3.2:

# 5.5 VDN EAM Info
VDN_VIB_PATH.1=/bin/vdn/vibs-6.3.2/5.5-5534162/vxlan.zip
VDN_VIB_VERSION.1=5534162
VDN_HOST_PRODUCT_LINE.1=embeddedEsx
VDN_HOST_VERSION.1=5.5.*

# 6.0 VDN EAM Info
VDN_VIB_PATH.2=/bin/vdn/vibs-6.3.2/6.0-5534166/vxlan.zip
VDN_VIB_VERSION.2=5534166
VDN_HOST_PRODUCT_LINE.2=embeddedEsx
VDN_HOST_VERSION.2=6.0.*

# 6.5 VDN EAM Info
VDN_VIB_PATH.3=/bin/vdn/vibs-6.3.2/6.5-5534171/vxlan.zip
VDN_VIB_VERSION.3=5534171
VDN_HOST_PRODUCT_LINE.3=embeddedEsx
VDN_HOST_VERSION.3=6.5.*

# Single Version associated with all the VIBs pointed by above VDN_VIB_PATH(s)
VDN_VIB_VERSION=6.3.2.5672532

Legacy vib location. Used by code to discover avaialble legacy vibs.
LEGACY_VDN_VIB_PATH_FS=/common/em/components/vdn/vibs/legacy/
LEGACY_VDN_VIB_PATH_WEB_ROOT=/bin/vdn/vibs/legacy/

So as you can see above, the VIB path for ESXi 6.5 for example would be:

VDN_VIB_PATH.3=/bin/vdn/vibs-6.3.2/6.5-5534171/vxlan.zip

And to access this as a URL, you’d simply tack this path onto the normal NSX https location as follows:

https://<nsxmanagerIP>/bin/vdn/vibs-6.3.2/6.5-5534171/vxlan.zip

The file itself is about 17MB in size in 6.3.2. Despite being named vxlan.zip, it actually contains two VIBs – both the VSIP module for DFW and message bus purposes as well as the VXLAN module for logical switching and routing.

NSX 6.2.8 Released!

It’s always an exciting time at VMware when a new NSX build goes ‘GA’. Yesterday (July 6th) marks the official release of NSX-V 6.2.8.

NSX 6.2.8 is a maintenance or patch release focused mainly on bug fixes, and there are quite a few in this one. You can head over to the release notes for the full list, but I’ll provide a few highlights below.

Before I do that, here are the relevant links:

In my opinion, some of the most important fixes in 6.2.8 include the following:

Fixed Issue 1760940: NSX Manager High CPU triggered by many simultaneous vMotion tasks

This was a fairly common issue that we would see in larger deployments with large numbers of dynamic security groups. The most common workflow that would trigger this would be putting a host into maintenance mode, triggering a large number of simultaneous vMotions. I’m happy to see that this one was finally fixed. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem that this has yet been corrected in any of the 6.3.x releases, but I’m sure it will come. You can find more information in VMware KB 2150668.

Fixed Issue 1854519: VMs lose North to south connectivity after migration from a VLAN to a bridged VXLAN

This next one is not quite so common, but I’ve personally seen a couple of customers hit this. If you have a VM in a VLAN network, and then move it to the VXLAN dvPortgroup associated with the bridge, connectivity is lost. This happens because a RARP doesn’t get sent to update the physical switch’s MAC table (VMware often uses RARP instead of GARP for this purpose). Most customers would use the VLAN backed half of the bridged network for physical devices, and not for VMs, but there is no reason why this shouldn’t work.

Fixed Issue 1849037: NSX Manager API threads get exhausted when communication link with NSX Edge is broken

I think this one is pretty self explanatory – if the manager can’t process API calls, a lot of the manager’s functionality is lost. There are a number of reasons an ESXi host could lose it’s communication channel to the NSX manager, so definitely a good fix.

Fixed Issue 1813363: Multiple IP addresses on same vNIC causes delays in firewall publish operation

Another good fix that should help to reduce NSX manager CPU utilization and improve scale. Multiple IPs on vNICs is fairly common to see.

Fixed Issue 1798537: DFW controller process on ESXi (vsfwd) may run out of memory

I’ve seen this issue a few times in very large micro segmentation environments, and very happy to see it fixed. This should certainly help improve stability and environment scale.

Completely Removing NSX

Admittedly, removing NSX from an environment was not my first choice of topics to cover, but I have found that the process is often misunderstood and done improperly. NSX isn’t just a few virtual machine appliances that can be deleted – there are hooks into numerous vCenter objects, your ESXi hosts and vCenter Server itself. To save yourself from some grief and a lot of manual cleanup, the removal must be done properly.

Thankfully, VMware does provide some high level instructions to follow in the public documentation. You’ll find these public docs for NSX 6.2.x and 6.3.x respectively here and here.

There are many reasons that someone may wish to remove NSX from a vSphere environment – maybe you’ve installed an evaluation copy to run a proof of concept or just want to start fresh again in your lab environment.  In my case I need to completely remove NSX 6.2.5 and install an older version of NSX for some version-specific testing in my home lab.

From a high level, the process should look something like this:

  1. Remove all VMs from Logical Switches.
  2. Remove NSX Edges and Distributed Logical Routers.
  3. Remove all Logical Switches.
  4. Uninstall NSX from all ESXi hosts in prepared clusters.
  5. Delete any Transport Zones.
  6. Delete the NSX Manager and NSX Controller appliances.
  7. Remove the NSX Manager hooks into vCenter, including the plugin/extension.
  8. Cleaning up the vSphere Web Client leftovers on the vCenter Server.

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